Reintegration of War-affected Children and Youth



Contract partner: SOS Children’s Villages - UgandaCountry: Uganda Funding amount: € 154.014,00Project start: 01.12.2004End: 15.12.2007

Short Description:

Overall goal


The work of SOS Children's Villages Uganda in Gulu was started as an effort to mitigate the impact of the eighteen-year conflict in Northern Uganda that has left many children in desperate family situations. The SOS programme in Gulu since 2002 has been to address specifically identified needs of orphaned and traumatised children currently living in vulnerable situations. Many of these children have been adversely affected by other factors associated with the conflict in the north namely: sexual abuse, unwanted pregnancies, forced marriages, child labour, sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and labelling. Many lack any form of opportunities through which to cope with their situation. The girl child, particularly those under eighteen, having been exposed to the ruthless conduct of the Lords Resistance Army soldiers, have very few options on their return from captivity. The stigma and discrimination that many of the formerly abducted children or their off springs face on return to their communities is also a major problem in the reintegration.

This project offers psychosocial care as well as recreational activities and vocational training for the affected youth to help them settle in their communities and families. The vocational training focuses on agriculture and farming skills and aims at developing them as income generating as well as food-securing activities. Furthermore these newly acquired skills for the youth who never had the opportunity to live in a 'normal' agricultural setting but only know the life in the bush or in the IDP-camps will enable them to be self-supporting, better welcomed by their families and with the end to the war self-sustaining upon return to their villages.


In addition sensitisation and awareness campaigns will be carried out to educate the local authorities to solicit their support. In order to increase the local problem solving capacity community volunteers and peer-group leaders will be trained in relevant skills.

project number2289-00/2004
source of fundingOEZA
sector Andere soziale Infrastruktur und Leistungen
tied
modality
marker
  • Policy marker: are used to identify, assess and facilitate the monitoring of activities in support of policy objectives concerning gender equality, aid to environment, participatory development/good governance, trade development and reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. Activities targeting the objectives of the Rio Conventions include the identification of biodiversity, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, and desertification.
    • 1= policy is a significant objective of the activity
    • 2= policy is the principal objective of the activity
  • Donor/ source of funding: The ADA is not only implementing projects and programmes of the Austrian Development Cooperation , but also projects funded from other sources and donors such as
    • AKF - Foreign Disaster Fund of the Austrian federal government
    • BMLFUW - Federal Ministry for Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water
    • EU - Funds of the European Commission
    • Others - various other donors are listed in ADA’s annual business report.
  • Type of Aid – Aid modalities: classifies transfers from the donor to the first recipient of funds such as budget support, core contributions and pooled programmes and funds to CSOs and multilateral organisations, project-type interventions, experts and other technical assistance, scholarships and student costs in donor countries, debt relief, administrative costs and other in-donor expenditures.
  • Purpose/ sector code: classifies the specific area of the recipient’s economic or social structure, funded by a bilateral contribution.
  • Tied/Untied: Untied aid is defined as loans and grants whose proceeds are fully and freely available to finance procurement from all OECD countries and substantially all developing countries. Transactions are considered tied unless the donor has, at the time of the aid offer, clearly specified a range of countries eligible for procurement which meets the tests for “untied” aid.